This is one of the strangest things I have seen in a while, probably not unexpected though. A vending machine company based in Wisconsin has offered to micro-chip its employees, and approximately 50 out of 85 of them have expressed an interest! It appears that the micro-chip will operate on the same basis as the traditional "swipe card" in larger organisations, in allowing employees to access areas, pay in the canteen etc. It will also facilitate logins to ICT.  The micro-chip is inserted into the employee's hand for at least three years. While apparently there is no ability to track it for GPS purposes (or at least that's what they say), this could be said to be a physical intrusion on the privacy of employees.  Also, what if employees refuse to be micro-chipped, can they be disciplined and ultimately lose their jobs?  While an employer would argue that the chip can't be inserted without employee consent, the argument would be similar to the data protection context - the consent can't be freely given in the context of the employment relationship, where there is fear of reprisal for refusing that consent. What if the micro-chip causes a health issue down the line? What if the company changes the ability of the chip to track GPS but either doesn't inform the employees or doesn't facilitate the removal of the micro-chip? Apparently this is something that is taking off in Sweden, but I'm not sure that Irish employers will be jumping to the top of the line for it (or indeed employees).  It may be something that could in theory be managed by the proper application of policies/procedures, but as with many employment law issues, it's the mismanagement of initiatives like this that make the headlines! Watch this space............